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A New Titleholder For Earliest Wine?

  • Tue, 14 Nov 2017 17:19
Where are the roots of the earliest wine? Countries in southwestern Asia have long contested who was first to ferment grapes. To date, the oldest widely accepted evidence for viniculture came from the Zagros Mountains of Iran. But now new research from the Republic of Georgia — a perennial and fierce challenger for the title — suggests people in that Southern Caucasus country were sipping the nectar of the gods even earlier. Wine* was all the rage throughout much of the ancient world All DiscoverMagazine.com content

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